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. >>> inflation tops the list for china's central bank chief. he's put off retirement to help oversee the economy. hello i'm yuko fukushima and this is "asia biz forecast." for many this past week the central focus was the central bank. the bank of japan welcomed a new chief and opened the door to a new era of monetary policy. haruhiko kuroda was sworn in wednesday as the new boj governor. he took over a day after masaaki shirakawa stepped down, kuroda bringing an end to more than a decade of inflation. prime minister shin bow abe it requires closer coordination between the government and the central bank as well as a boj chief willing to undertake bold monetary easing. by all accounts, kuroda is his man. >> translator: the japanese economy has been struggling with deflation for nearly 15 years. the greatest mission of the central bank is to end deflation and achieve the inflation target of 2% as soon as possible. >> cue row do da has said he believes the boj can achieve the target within two years and says he'll use every tool at his disposal to make that happen. >> translator: the bank of japan
and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. a great show for you today. first up, the question for the economy. should we save or should we spend? what will get the economy moving faster? i'll talk to the chief proponent of spending. nobel prize winning economist paul krugman. then, the race for space. is america losing? china is building its own space station and the u.s. has to rely on russia to send our astronauts up to the stars. what is going on? >>> and the exploding middle class. in more than seven years it will triple in size to almost 2 billion people. it will change the world. we'll talk about how. >>> but, first, here's my take. those of you who follow the show reg lerly know i have long argued that cutting government spending in the midst of a weak recovery is not a path towards growth. but i have also argued that america does have a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is, the vast majority of our debt problems relate to the costs of health care in america. now that the debate over obama care is over, we should start thinking about how to get am
to be fiscally responsible and reduce the deficit. to make velft to grow our economy and to meet our obligation to our seniors, to our families and to our future and the republican budget fails all three. republican budget threatens our nation by undermining our economic growth and by shifting the financial burden for the deficit, and the deficit reduction, to our seniors and the middle class. republicans have made their choices clear, end medicare as we know it, adding costs to seniors today and ending the medicare guarantee tomorrow, slashing investments necessary for economic competitiveness and giving millionaires an average of $400,000 in tax breaks. republican budget eliminates protection for millions of our sickest seniors who depend on nursing home and home health services and republican budget will increase taxes for average middle-class families by $3,000. their choices will cost two million jobs next year alone and decrease economic growth by 1.7%. in contrast, the democratic alternative present serves -- preserves the medicare guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation
to the economy. the economy needs financial assistance from the outside from the european union and i'm afraid the people running the show presumably the germans in the first instance have decided greek depositors should take a hit. the way that played out at least over the weekend was all depositors would take a hit of some kind no matter how small their deposit. it sales to be now an attempt to back away from that and focus on people with deposits over 100,000 euros targeting in part russians who hold a large amounts of money, claims on those cyprian banks. >> rose: when that happened what was the talk in the financial community citing your com a couple quotes one from dennis gotman the binging has been shaken to its roots. the banking depends on trust. he wrote a note to his clients trust that has now been shattered, broken and destroyed. jim o'neal at goldman sachs says astonishing with very little thought of containing. >> bailout 101 is you want to keep the money in the banks. you want to avoid a run on the banks. you want to avoid where people are standing outside wanting their cash be
to jump-start the economy, not just the stock market. let's go to nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. david: let's start, nicole. we start with fedex it was an extraordinary run-up. it was in the $100 range. it pulls back quite a bit. this is the biggest pullback since 2011? >> certainly is, the biggest pull back since 2011. concerns globally and also going to cut down what they're shipping over it asia. lauren: how is oracle looking ahead of their earnings release, nicole? >> we're watching oracle closely in the tax realm. we'll see whether or not they have earnings. [closing bell rings] david: best buy up another 5%. that stock can not be denied. as you her the bells are ringing on wall street. looks like the indexes are going to keep essentially where they were before and after ben bernanke began to talk. looked like they were sliding a bit. they stopped that slide. trading this the 50 to 60-point range on the dow. the s&p is doing better percentagewise. nasdaq is doing well. russell 2000, small and mid-sized caps doing well. there are interesting company stories and sect
laugh. we'll get his prediction where natural gas prices are headed next. >>> not even a down economy can crush rock and roll. legendar kiss rockers gene simmons and paul stanley kick off a big expan shun of their restaurants. they're here in first on fox interview to tell us why now is the time to bet on the consumer. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: first let's turn to today's market moment. fears over cyprus's bailout led to a choppy day of trading on wall street. the dow managed to eke out a slight gain wi the nasdaq and s&p 500 posting minor laws. the s&p fell for thehird straight seson. that is the worst losing streak of the year. microsoft could be in some hot water with the justice department. microsoft and some of its business partners are being investigated over a foreign bribery claims. government officials in china, italy and romania were allegedly bribed to earn software contracts but shares of microsoft still managed to close the day up slightly. >>> all right we start tonight in cyprus. th parliament rejected the tax on bank deposits, potent
mostly on the british economy. specifically on budget reform, childcare benefit, and performs to the national health service this is just over 30 minutes. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. businessorning, i had with ministerial colleagues and others and i shall have further such meetings later today. time minister the believes there is an alternative to his double debt and his loss of a aaa credit rating. is he aware that some in his cabinet believe there is an alternative for him? >> what this government is delivering is a million private sector jobs, the fastest rate of job creation in this country's history and banged on the debt by 25%. we have cut immigration by a third. we have a long road to travel, but we are going in the right direction. i'm sure that the prime minister will wish to add his condolences to the family and friends of christina at ken's who was murdered on a path to school in my constituency last thursday morning. the government is right to introduce minimum custodial substances for people convicted of threatening some
money into the economy? they let us know the exit plan for all of this. melissa: taxpayer outrage, bankrupt city in california paying out a million dollars in pay raises. they are bankrupt. lori: and paying races? crazy town. fedex says more customers are taking a less expensive option and it is hitting the bottom line. melissa: the cyber threat hit by online hackers putting financial firms here on high alert. but first, time for stocks now. nicole petallides is standing by. stocks posted solid gains ahead of the fed decision. nicole: that is right. everybody focused on the fed about an hour away from now. very accommodated if fed, and we're watching a market hitting new all-time highs in the dow jones industrial. of almost 56 points at the moment showing you some names that hit some highs today including nativ united technolo. hitting the highest levels we've ever seen for those names and we cannot leave out verizon. the highest levels we'v we haven in over 11 years. so while the shareholders have been enjoying great dividends, they can now also note multi-year highs as well. as
economist. we're talking extraordinary weakness here, especially in the two most important economies, germany and france. >> yes. what we saw towards the beginning of the year, what we were hoping was we would see in the u.s. in the second quarter and maybe a third number. what these number res sharing, while we're seeing the rate of contraction to ease in the third quarter, around 4.6% declines. what we saw at the end of the quarter, regathering momentum and that puts the usa in a weak position heading into the second quarter. >> i was going to ask, too, the there's any way, these are sentiment surveys. these are not going on out and measuring production. what it does, it oles the companies themselves, asks them about data. pretty reliable whether it's the u.s. version of these or the global ones with tracking equity prices. and the point here is, this is the first reading of sentiment in march. yet it doesn't seem as though this was necessarily nud by the latest out of cypress. this would have all fallen before this happened. >> yeah. it's asking for hard information whether it is
, the question for the american economy. should we save or spend? what will get the economy moving faster. i will talk to the chief pro-economist of spending paul krugman and then the race for space, is america losing? china is building it own space station and the u.s. has to reeli on russia to send our astronauts to the stars. what's going on? and the exploding issue, middle class. in seven years it will more than triple in size to almost 2 billion people. it will change the world. we'll talk about how. but first here's my take. those of you who followed the show regularly know that i have long argued that cutting government spending if the midst of a weak recovery is not a path toward growth. i have also argued that america has a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is that the vast majority of our problem is related to the cost of health care in america. now the debate over obama care is over, we should start to think seriously of how to get america's health care costs under control. as it turns out a book and magazine story provide ways to think of th
reserve's two day meeting on the economy wraps up. that begins at 2:30 eastern time. >> coming up, the head of immigration and customs enforcement testifies about the release of nearly 2000 immigrants because of budget constraints. the 2014 budget plan put out by chairman paul ryan would balance the budget in 10 years and put in place medicare changes. the chamber should finish work on boating on the measure on wednesday. here is tuesday's debate. mr. ryan: i bring forward and present the budget resolution for the fiscal year 2014. we believe that we owe the american people a responsible balanced budget and that is precisely what we are bringing to the floor today. our budget balances the budget within 10 years and it does so without raising taxes. balancing the budget will help us foster a healthier economy, it will help us create jobs. in fact, two leading economists released a study analyzing our budget and its positive effects on the economy and jobs. in the first year they said it would, quote, boost the economy immediately, increasing both of our economy by a whole percentag
the economy grow more and more jobs be created because we have had the slowest recovery during this recession since any time after the world war ii, at least. very, very slow. but we have done something to a degree we have never done before, and that is borrow and spend to stimulate the economy. and someone has compared borrowing and spending to stimulate the economy to the idea of someone taking a bucket, scooping up water in one end of the swimming pool and pouring it into the other. you have got no net gain. the truth is you lose some of the water out of the bucket as you walk along the shore. in this case what we lose is, we lose interest on that debt indefinitely because there's no plan to pay down the debt. so this budget that's before us today does not balance, it does not put us on a sound path, it does not create confidence in the -- among the american citizens that the future is going to be sound, that we've gotten this country reoriented in a way that's going to produce long-term growth. indeed, it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's goin
we all want to go. wwe want to have a growing economy, weal we want to deal with our deficit. these are challenging, complex goals. we can get there. even the action of this body last night in passing the fyn.2013 appropriations bill shows we can cooperate together and with the thousands get there. it is my hope that that will inspire us going forward. the question is this: we all agree that what has been done thus far in the area of deficit reduction equates to about $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction that has been done by the last congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls abo
and teach you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. i got two of them here. you've got the good economy. tremendous housing numbers, miraculous retail sales, terrific oil and gas markets. you have the bad economy. weakening commodity prices. slow commercial real estate business. really bad world commerce outlook. real soft information technology sales. you mix them all up together and you get the absolute perfect environment for the fed reserve to stay stock market friendly. that's exactly what happened today. ben bernanke allowed the averages to power higher. dow gained 56 points. the s&p rising today, nasdaq jumping .78%. it's not sleight of hand or alchemy at work here, despite what critics say when they constantly slam the fed. >> boo! >> bernanke is not playing a game of move the stock market higher by simply continuing to keep the competition from bonds incredibly weak. he's got a real good reason for doing what he's doing, which is staying the course, keeping rates low. that reason? 1937. see, ben bernanke is a rigorous guy. he's a professor and a genuine scholar of american financial histor
brands think of the economy and the american consumer? susie sits down with the top man at coca-cola. all that and more coming up right now on "nbr." good evening and welcome to our public television viewers. susie, once again, little cyprus making big economic noise today. >> you're right, tyler. actually a big win for citizens in cyprus. lawmakers rejected today an unpopular and unprecedented proposal to tax bank deposits. it was part of a larger eurozone bailout plan to rescue those banks and keep the nation solvent. the crucial vote came after a wave of protests, and as cypr t cypriots scrambled to withdraw cash from their atms. bertha coombs joins us with more on today's historic vote and what's ahead for cyprus? >> what's ahead is a very big question. the world was watching the tiny island nation again today, in a show of hands-on opposition, party members voted no on a tax and 10% of bank deposits, a condition set by eurozone officials to secure 10 billion euro bailout. many called it extortion. ruling party members abstained saying beyond saying no they need to find another plan.
correction? with the rising economy and profits this rally still has legs. also in year three of obama care premiums and insurance costs are rising sky-high. so are taxes. and small business costs are reducing profits by as much as 65% according to one small business owner we will talk to tonight. and the virtues of a free market capitalism that we talk about every night on this show are now forbidden fruit at stanford university. a popular long running pro capitalist course at that school has now been cancelled. what is up with that? "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up, a major vote in the cyprus parliament helping to get that country closer to a teal with the european union. michelle caruso-cabrera joins us from cyprus again this evening with the very latest. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: larry, lawmakers here in cyprus taking a huge step tonight to prevent the financial collapse of their country. they pass ad law that will allow for the restructuring of their banks. this essentially means their sickest and largest banks will be down sized and made more healthy. this
economy. its banks are not highly connected with the rest of the international financial system. there is no risk of contagion here. >> adam, actually, of all the ideas you laid out, which do you think is the least bad of all those solutions? is it going ahead and letting the banks fail? >> that would be my preferred route. failure implies that the banks can't pay their depositors. they are restructuring. they will be very orderly. basically, the banks would be closed for two days. what would come out is when they reopen, the depositors would be the large depositors because the small depositors would be fully protected. the large depositors would be the owners of a bank and they would have deposits of somewhere between 50 1k3 60 or 70% of their money and the rest of the shares in the new bank. the banks would be solvent. the banks could be highly capitalized and they would then have access to the ecb for refinancing to provide any liquidity. >> and the fallout from that would be that the russians -- >> and basically -- >> the fallout for that is that the russians are the ones wh
those economies dramatically, weakens those countries. and it also weakens italy. >> you're saying potential contagion. finally, how does it get resolved? michelle is talking about a good bank/bad bank, nobody pays on deposits up to $100,000. the bailout is 10 billion euros from the european -- ecb. the bail-in is about $6 billion euros. so greece is looking for whatever they're looking for, $4 billion, $5 billion. or does europe bail that out even more? >> the biggest factor of all, dan and i were talking a couple minutes ago, the depositors above 100,000 will lose 40% to 50%. >> those are russians. they're going to be pissed off. >> the great systemic problem of giant bank failures is somewhat eliminated by what they're putting forward now. >> what do you think, dan? does this work? >> for our viewers i don't think it matters. the specifics are super interesting, we're going to go have a drink. what matters to people at home, what matters to the larger story is we decided that people's property in banks was not their own. >> in europe or in the u.s., too? >> in europe only. >> th
to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close those special interest tax loopholes that riddle our tax code, republicans said no. democrats proposed to offset unwise republican cuts to medical research like alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes research at n.i.h., republicans said no. democrats tried to cut the special interest spending in the tax code to offset republican cuts to students who rely on pell grants but republicans said no. mr. van hollen: i yield the gentleman another minute and a half. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. ms. castor: the democrats in the budget committee proposed to strengthen medicare and replace the republican plan to turn medicare into a voucher program. all it does is simply shift the cost tour families and older neighbors. mr. speaker, this republican budget is not consistent with american values. it is not fiscally responsible. it is a
bernanke will keep printing to bail out barack obama's weak economy. and print as many yen as it takes to bail out japan. the markets truly love it. europe is the odd man out. they've given ultimatum to cyprus, no bailout if you can't get it together by next tuesday. here is something else to get you fired up. cyprus wants to nationallize y payshun money. "varney & company" is about to begin. [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futureses move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webinars. and trade with papermoney to test-drive the market. ♪ all on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. all on thinkorswim. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >> thursday, march 21st. m headline today, ben bernanke
affect the u.s. economy. presumably including cyprus. as well as the improving u.s. job market, and strong housing sector. and as we wait for fed officials to wrap up their meeting tomorrow, it's expected they will leave interest rates unchanged. joining us to talk more about the fed, randall krosner, former fed governor and now professor of economics at the university of chicago. i've not had the benefit of being in those meetings. you have, and i'm curious to know, do you think cyprus came up? if so, how? and how would the fed governors and members of the fomc handicap its possible effects on the u.s. economy? >> it certainly would have come up, i think, if some analogies with iceland from a number of years ago. even a smaller country, only 250,000 people, not a million people, but it was something that we focused on. we worried about and tried to think of what the implications are. here it's clear the europeans have made i think a terrible mistake in making this proposal. that potentially could undermine confidence, and that could have knock-on effects not only for the whole
part of the economy that's being left at a tivitate now, and where's the exit strategy? >> and i think revenue could be an issue. oracle is out with its third quarter. revenue came at 8.6 billion versus 9.3 billion, an estimate. jon fortt has all the numbers right now. >> let's drill down to some numbers, maria. exactly where oracle missed, because this is a miss. on new license and cloud revenue, the street was looking for 2.57 billion. they came in at $2.3. on hardware product revenue, the street wanted somewhere around $800 million in research. they came in at $671 million. that's well below their guided range on that. and on non-gap operating margin, they came in at 47%, which is right about where the street was looking. they don't give guidance until the call, but this is really important, because they're guiding into their biggest quarter, their fiscal q4. also, larry ellison has said the hardware business was going to have a transition quarter in q3. we should expect to start seeing it growing in q4, given this hardware number, it's going to be especially important for them to b
to share with you some views of the economy from our 54 respo respondents. firming housing prices are a game changer. there is something much more self-feeding about recovery this year. could be a turning point. the objepposite from john rober. we believe a recession/economic slowdown is a possibility in the latter half of 2014 or early in 2015. some of the excesses that could cause a recession are beginning to build in the economy. another piece of data, the biggest problems facing our economy, taxes/regulation, 29%. i would say that's a victory given that europe is not in there for fear of recession is not in there. too much deficit reduction, 16%. slow job growth, 12%. too little deficit reduction, 10%. guys, these are more normal problems, i would say, than we've had in the past. the european financial crisis, u.s. financial crisis. sue, i would take a victory, yes, there are problems out there. >> i totally agree with you. it's the first time in a long time we haven't seen europe on a list like that. >> thank you, steve. >> absolutely. thanks, steve. >> sure. >> the markets h
idea. i mean, if you look at cyprus' economy, there are two major factors to that economy. tourism and financial services. you could kill the financial services immediately right there. so it's two underpinnings. almost like when greece was doing smo of the same things. >> but you say it matters because it could spread elsewhere? >> just the thought that somebody thought this was a good idea is scary enough to me, i would think. but it's going to be one of those things. we'll have to watch and see how it folds out. but i've got a feeling it will have to turn itself around fairly quickly. >> michael, what do you think? have you changed any of your behavior in terms of allocating capital, as a result of what we've seen in the last 48 hours? >> no, not really, maria. i still think that cyprus is certainly something to watch. but i think it's just part of the negotiation process, exactly what's happening in greece. we have to watch and see if it accelerates and this idea sweeps around europe, but i doubt that's going to happen. i actually think that europe is starting to present some o
by foreign media organizations. i think there are two main concerns. first, whether the chinese economy will continue to grow sustainably. and secondly, whether a stronger china will become more assertive, and even -- [inaudible] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: i think these two concerns are really necessary. china is capable of achieving sustainable and a healthy economic development, in pursuing social progress. and that are more than 1.3 billion people in this country so we are on a long journey towards modernization. for that we would require an international environment of lasting peace. even if china becomes stronger, we will not seek edge me. because we have learned from our own experience in the modern period that one should not impose on others what he himself does not desire. this is an article of faith for us. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: let me underscore here that china has an unwavering commitment to peaceful development. we also have an unshakable determination to safeguard our country's sovereignty and terri
economy. that is the real engine of the economic prosperity. >>> plus the supreme court this week will hear two important cases concerning same sex marriage. shouldn't the black robe masters leave the important social decisions to the states and their democratically elected legislatures or referenda? let the people decide. "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up, in recent weeks, he's become a conservative super hero icon. that following his triumphant speeches at the national prayer service and the cpac political conference. dr. ben carson has a message to roll back obama care, deal with the crushing national debt, and even a bib llically based call r a flat tax. that's what i love. is he the conservative that can save the gop? here is the aforementioned dr. ben carson. director of the pediatric division at john hopkins university. and with us this hour, cnbc contributors keith boykin. as always, dr. carson, great to see you. i'm reading one of many articles that you're retiring in 100 days. i wonder if you would share future plans, especially public service. >> i have
economy, child-care benefits, and reforms to the national health service. this is just over 30 minutes. >> order. questions to the prime minister. eagues and others and in addition to my duties in this house i shall have server, furt >> the prime minister. >> this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and, in addition to my duties in this house, i shall have further such meetings later today. >> we all know that the prime minister believes there is no alternative to his double-dip, his double-debt, or his loss of the triple-a credit rating, but is he aware that his back benchers and some of his cabinet believe there is an alternative to him? hear, hear. >> what this government are delivering are 1 million private-sector jobs and the fastest rate of new business noires history. we have paid down the deficit by 25% and have cut immigration by a third. we have a long, hard road to travel, but we are going in the right direction. >> hear, hear. >> mr. james morris. >> i am sure that the prime minister will wish to add his condolences to the family and friends of c
is not buying it. and some economists are now saying that there's a shadow economy that could explain why the retail sales are rising despite static credit spending and paychecks. an explanation at last. at it all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. >>> from fox, at 3:00 in new york city, seven u.s. marines are dead and several others hurt after a training exercise in nevada. it happened at hawthorne army depot there last night. the military uses that base to store weapons and train troops. according to military sources, large mortar, like the one you see hour, somehow exploded. officials describe frantic scene. it was 45-minute chopper flight to the nearest trauma center in reno. today the white house says the president is watching the developments. >> the president's thoughts and prayers go to the families of those who were lost and those who are injured. we're obviously in the early stages of assessing the incident. it's a tragedy, clearly, and the president was briefed immediately on -- and made aware of it immediately and briefed on it, and we're monitoring the situation.
. connell: highest level close to five years. the economy may be improving. the problem for president obama is his approval rating is not. 47% of americans approving. doug shaw is here to answer that. a record-breaking run last week. you have home production neared the unemployment rate falling. >> first of all, we have dysfunction in washington. we do not have a budget deal. economic growth was tested in the fourth quarter. there is no sign that it is reviving. there really is no revival on main street. connell: is there something politically bad be done? is there something they are not doing right? shouldn't they be better able to take advantage of the perfect stock market and little bit better economic numbers? i think the president is trying to do that now, connell. reaching out to the public senators and paul ryan. we made a deal on the but with newt gingrich. the same thing needs to be done now. dagen: something really struck me. i do not mean to harp on it. the average american wakes up in the morning, you tell me how he feels or she feels that deficit with the daily impact. you kind
, it has taken us 40 years to build our economy to the level it is. with done one day -- within one day, we have shot it down. we are very betrayed. >> they can do it anywhere. live in europe, europe has betrayed us. >> at one stage, the crowd was urged to march towards the presidential palace. many people believed their savings had been guaranteed. what is clear is that the bailout deal negotiated in brussels cannot be implemented here except in the face of furious opposition. will have depositors to pay -- just reducing the amounts savers and depositors will have to pay probably won't be enough. teeple are still trying to get their money out of cash machines, but there are limits on how much they can withdraw. a parliamentary vote on the bailout has been postponed yet again. the government feared it might not win a majority for the bailout. without extra funding, cyprus faces bankruptcy. the british community around -- the british community, around 60,000, is also assessing its losses. cypriot friends are in shock. >> they felt as though someone had put their hand in their pocket and take
food assistance to kids in this country and funding for r&d will drive our economy, but we can't appropriate a sum of money to fix the real cost of iraq. can't pay back the lives of 4,486 american men and women who have died there or the roughly 2,000 broken soldiers who came home and took their own lives. the wounded, physically and mentally, the soldiers who didn't know how not to be a soldier, the families living with a hole in their hearts and the families living with someone they no longer recognize. 10 years leaving their families, living in hell, coming home to unemployment and the homelessness, to a country that's forgotten that it's at war at all, to a country that seems to think a yellow ribbon magnet on their bumper is the only kind of support that oir troops need and the cost in iraq, untold deaths. let me rephrase that. unknown deaths. we can only guess at the destruction that we have left in our wake. 115,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in
and the new fed forecast for the economy. and the stocks we're focused on this morning, blackberry getting an upgrade at morgan stanley and a note titled why it won't go down and it gets into the best buy bull camp, and calling it the best near-term idea in the sector. let's get straight to fedex. the package delivery company says it earned $1.23 a share in the fiscal third quarter and below wall street forecasts. fedex says the customers were choosing slower transit services. this does happen, of course, after a massive run in the transports. >> one of the things that amazes me about fedex is they keep missing and they get loved a few days later. missed and gets loved. it's still regarded as being a profit machine. they have this restructuring that people like very much. people feel it's only a matter of time before someone steps up to the more expensive freight. to me, my charitable trust owns ups. ups has the expectations lower. scott davis always says negative things. >> melissa hit the nail on the head. the stock had a big run and the two guys were going head to head over what was in
times the size of its economy without having some kind of bail structure in a solution, it becomes very difficult. and i think that understanding is quite clear among investors. so from a longer term perspective, i think there's a positive element here which is a more substantial bailin in this solution. >> valentin, what kind of exposure do you have in europe at this point and what changes have you made in regard to how the cypriot levy is handled? >> it is creating a bit of uncertainty. clearly, it comes from lingering uncertainty over the political situation in italy. so all in all, it makes the bit more cautious on europe. not so much on our overall willingness to take risks. we're still overweight global real estate, but we have still put down our exposure in europe, so we are now under weight european equities. we are cautious on peripheral bull markets and european fixed income space. so that is the main changes. still on the regional allocation that we have, but not so much altering our overall willingness to look for risk. i think in general, the broadening of the global cycle
. this will trigger profound changes in our economy and society. it needs to be supported by integrated reforms in many different areas. we need to overcome the problems that might crop up in the course of urbanization. i know that according to the statistics currently available, there are about 500 suggestions and proposals, about urbanization made during the npc and cbbc seat session. we were you all of them very carefully and pursue urbanization in a steady, acted and a prudent way. [speaking chineseway. >> nowadays, food safety has become very, very serious issue. we can see the sky in beijing this weekend. is it possible for the chinese development, to solve this problem while maintaining the speed of economic development? and will it give more space for chinese people to monitor this issue? thank you. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: i said earlier that we want to fully upgrade the chinese economy. that's also includes that in the course of development we will do our best to make sure that our people can breathe
and that will lead to a decline in the money that is slowing around the economy and that means lower output essentially. so what we're looking at here in cyprus is that the retracted recession is not depression. let's continue with the discussion with professor pisteritus. thank you so much for joining us this morning. just how do you read the deal? did the germans win in the end? >> well, i would have to agree with you that what the germans wanted has happened in the end. it's an incredibly bad deal for the eurozone. cyprus is table because you are taking away from the island more than half its gdp. you're destroying small enterprises and the sector which accounted for 45% of gdp. expect unemployment to shoot up. we are not sure what the next step in this model is going to to be, but what has even wider implications is that the for the first time within the eurozone, depositors had to bail out ailing banks. and that happened in the 1930s. there were bank runs. we introduced deposit insurance. we introduced polling schemes for risk. in europe, we are headed for a banking union next year so
a little bit. >> that's a good point. for a long time the bears have been insisting that the global economy is not as healthy as this teflon stock market in the united states would indicate, and now they've got some ammunition. two companies from fed ex and from caterpillar. now, caterpillar had dismal three-month sales numbers. really shocked a lot of people. fed ex, of course, had disappointing earnings situation, lower than expected international volume. now people are saying, see, we told you. here are who big companies who are saying it's not as big as everybody said. deere got a downgrade from wells fargo. i'll talk more about that in the 2:00. a little bit of good news on housing. keeps rolling along. lenore, 34% increase in building. >> we'll see you back in a few minutes. ty, we'll send it back up to you. >> thank you very much. bob just gave you a very clear shot at the market picture, so what's driving it? well, obviously three developing stories and we're going to cue you in on all of them right now. the fed, steve liesman is in washington. russia's financial overtures toward cy
in macau's economy. 2013 will look good. melco crown and boyd gaming also a standout. "after the bell" starts right now. david: so here's question, when is it tir moyle actually good for the markets and the economy? well, when it is overseas. renowned professor jeremy siegel telling us why the european crisis could be a win for the u.s. and send the markets soaring to 16,000. liz: protesters are a win for us. we'll fund out more from dr. siegel. we know the feeling standing on the corner waiting for the taxis and being surprised how much that meter ran up while you sat there in the car with traffic. a new company hopes to make that aggravation go away by making taxis obsolete. ceo of sidecar is joining us. david: want to hear about that story coming up. we'll tell you what drove today's markets with today's data download. it is a down day on wall street as investors worry what is next for the eurozone. stocks gave up gains on all three major indices, ending the trading day low. industrials and materials led the decline. well the euro extending its losses against the dollar falling mor
a campaign on jobs and the economy, jobbing and the economy, jobs and the economy and beat that drum until i beat people into sleep. that's part of it, all right, but all of the rest of this has to be added together, or we can never reconstruct this country. we will not get the pillars of american exceptionalism back together. [applause] unless we have the full spectrum. if we can restore our families and strengthen our faith and protect innocent, unborn human life instead of assaulting it with a half a billion dollars appropriated to planned parenthood in a single year. that's gotta go. obamacare has got to go. [cheers and applause] we can't let up on obamacare and believe that somehow we're going to capitulate to that side because the roads are vitality, and it is an unconstitutional taking of god-given american liberty, and it's got to go. [cheers and applause] ronald reagan omelet me down a couple -- only let me down a couple of times in eight years. one of those was 1986, and i still had the dent after i heard on the news he had signed the amnesty act of 1986. but it was on the promise
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
, the appropriate spending reduction so we can try to get this economy back on track. excitingt is an activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of representatives today. this is a budget by paul ryan that will allow us to get to balance. that means the government will stop sending more money than it takes in by the end of the decade, which is really exciting. what that allows us to do is to get the economy rolling, jobs being created and provide more certainty so young people coming out of college know there is going to be a job in their field. those in the workforce will know they will be needed. those in retirement, social security and medicare and those will be strengthened and security. an exciting time. guest: -- the: when it comes to continued resolution which funds the government through september, did it include sequester cuts that took effect earlier this month? spending atcludes the sequester level. there is flex ability for the military, department of defense and a few other areas that allow money to be moved to areas of
and howard ward. >> economy is getting better, capital chase returns and stocks continue to trend higher although there's profit taking here and there. >> okay. we'll take that to the bank. the key question about europe. it's all about credit quality. >> who do we have to worry about? >> spanish, italian and greece. >> you're very worried. >> people have to start doing their work. europe never did the work of fixing bank solvency in the first place. >> gentlemen, thank you for being here. >> happy monday. >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to the last week of the first quarter. good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with melissa lee and jim kraker. futures reflecting the relief of the cyprus deal. a similar picture in europe where the italian tenure is now below where it was before those italian elections and a mixed picture in asia this morning. the nikkei up about 1.5%. the road map begin with the eurozone that did not collapse over the weekend so natura
than three hours from the federal reserve notes and whether or not it continues stimulating the economy at the current levels, keeps propping things up. why don't you just pick up from where we left off because talking about washington related to the bigger picture scenario not assist early today but the role the federal reserve plays in all of this as long as interest rates stay as low as they are, what do you think? >> the fed plays a big role keeping interest rates low. i heard on the fiscal side, you're right, maybe outside of the beltway the washington fatigue, but returned to the fed, everyday to indicate the fed keeps the pedal to the metal, 85 billion per month, there'll be some talk about scaling it back later this year. the thing to watch is the fed forecast. all the members put in the economic forecast for the next three years. my guess is it'll be a little bit more promising for social and employment rate above 6.5% until 2015 and that is the threshold, they will not move interest rates up before your employment rate gets to that level, that is still at least two years from
revenues. it would cut waste, add jobs and spur economic growth of the economy. it would reduce the deficit by an additional $1.8 trillion without jeopardizing the recovery or harming the middle class. it includes $1.2 trillion in new revenue obtained not by tax increases but by closing loopholes and eliminating wasteful spending that benefits the wealthiest americans and the largest corporations. it eliminates $4 billion in annual tax breaks to the oil and gas industry, an industry that is making profits. they don't need a tax break. in fact, they're making enormous profits. so, why does the ryan budget give them a government subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion
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